Home » Blog » Dry Mein

Dry Mein

This post may contain affiliate links. Read my disclosure policy.

Sharing is caring!

Slightly sweet yet salty seasoned noodle goodness topped with delectable garnishes make this easy dry mein recipe a perfect weeknight dinner choice.

dry mein noodles on a black plate

Dry mein is a popular dish in Hawai’i.  Growing up my mom would make this dish at least once a month. I loved the kamaboko and shoyu sugar glazed spam bits. Don’t tell her, but as a kid I would pick out the carrot and green onions. Now I gladly gobble all those toppings up.

Iwamoto undried saimin

Here’s another dinner idea.

What is dry mein?

Dry mein is a noodle dish tossed in sauce and topped with all types of garnishes. It is served without the typical broth (hence “dry”) as saimin or ramen does.

dry mein noodles in shoyu sugar sauce

What type of garnishes can be used to make dry mein?

  • Char siu pork
  • Kamaboko
  • Spam
  • Green onion
  • Carrots
  • Bean sprouts (I often leave these out per my kids request)
toppings for dry mein

What is kamaboko?

Kamaboko, also known as fish cake, is popular in Japanese cuisine. It is made by pureeing fish, adding flavorings, and pressing into a loaf shape. It is then steamed until cooked. I like to use the pink and white kamaboko. You bet as a kid I would sneak a slice or five while my mom was prepping the noodles. You can find kamaboko in the refrigerated section of your grocery store.

What type of noodles are used to make dry mein?

I use undried saimin noodles. I like the Iwamoto brand.

dry mein noodles in a pan

How long does it take to cook undried saimin noodles?

2-3 minutes in a pot of water at rolling boil. Do not go much longer than this or you will end up with mushy noodles.

How to store dry mein?

Dry mein can be placed in an airtight container and refrigerated for 3-4 days.

close up of toppings

How to warm up dry mein?

This noodle dish can be warmed up in the microwave or tossed in a saute pan on the stove.

How to make dry mein?

Bring a large pot of water to a boil. Rinse noodles under cold running water to remove excess starch. When pot of water is at a rolling boil add noodles for 2-3 minutes or until al dente. Strain noodles and rinse with cool water to stop the cooking process. In a small mixing bowl add shoyu and sugar. Whisk until well combined and set aside. In a saute pan or wok add half of the shoyu sugar mix and fry spam until sauce has caramelized and the spam is crispy and browned. Remove spam from pan and set aside. Pour half of the remaining shoyu sugar mix to pan. Toss half of the cooked noodles in the sauce for a few seconds. Remove noodles from pan and place in a baking pan (or container of your choice). Repeat with remaining sauce and noodles. Layer char siu, green onions, carrots, kamaboko, and spam on noodles. Serve warm.

dry mein noodles on a black plate

Dry mein

Yield: 6 servings
Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 5 minutes
Total Time: 15 minutes

Slightly sweet yet salty seasoned noodle goodness topped with delectable garnishes make this easy dry mein recipe an easy weeknight dinner choice.

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 pounds undried saimin noodles
  • 4 tablespoons shoyu, divided
  • 4 tablespoons granulated sugar, divided
  • 1/2 pound char siu, cubed
  • 6 green onions, chopped
  • 1 large carrot, grated
  • 1 (6 ounce) slab of kamaboko, cubed
  • 1/2 can of Spam, cubed

Instructions

  1. Bring a large pot of water to a boil.
  2. Rinse noodles under cold running water to remove excess starch.
  3. When pot of water is at a rolling boil add noodles for 2-3 minutes or until al dente.
  4. Strain noodles and rinse with cool water to stop the cooking.
  5. In a small mixing bowl add shoyu and sugar. Whisk until well combined and set aside.
  6. In a saute pan or wok add half of the shoyu sugar mix and fry spam until sauce caramelized and the spam is crispy and browned.
  7. Remove spam from pan and set aside.
  8. Pour half of the remaining shoyu sugar mix to pan. Toss half of the cooked noodles in the sauce. Remove noodles from pan and place in a baking pan (or container of your choice)
  9. Repeat with remaining sauce and noodles.
  10. Layer char siu, green onions, carrots, kamaboko, and spam on noodles.
  11. Serve warm.

Recommended Products

As an Amazon Associate and member of other affiliate programs, I earn from qualifying purchases.

Nutrition Information:
Yield: 6 Serving Size: 1
Amount Per Serving: Calories: 237Total Fat: 6gSaturated Fat: 2gTrans Fat: 0gUnsaturated Fat: 3gCholesterol: 52mgSodium: 779mgCarbohydrates: 30gFiber: 1gSugar: 13gProtein: 16g

Nutrition information isn’t always accurate.

Did you make this recipe?

Please leave a comment on the blog or share a photo on Instagram

Tried this recipe? Tag me on social. I’d love to see and share it.

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/keeping.it.relle/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/keepingitrelle

Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/keepingitrelle/

Love this recipe? Please give it a 5 star rating.


By on August 8th, 2019

About Relle

Aloha, my name is Relle and welcome to my little home on the internet where I like to share all my favorite Hawaiian recipes (and local ones too).

I am a wife, mom of two, and nurse practitioner here in the beautiful state of Hawai’i. I was born and raised in Hawai’i and I am of native Hawaiian descent. In my spare time I love to cook and bake and I have compiled many of my favorite recipes here for you to enjoy.

More posts by this author.

Leave a Comment

Skip to Recipe